<p>The Board of Directors of NGAI has established a scholarship program to support members' families. The scholarship is open to dependents (both children and spouses) of NGAI members in good standing. The program will award one $2,500.00 scholarship to an IL Army National Guard dependent, one $2,500.00 scholarship to an IL Air National Guard dependent and one $2,500 scholarship to an at large dependent. In addition, a fourth $1,000.00 scholarship sponsored by USAA Insurance and Financial Services Company through the Enlisted Association of the national Guard of the United Stataes (EANGUS,) will be awarded to a dependent of an enlisted IL National Guard NGAI member. </p><p>All four scholarship winners will be selected from the pool of Prairie Minuteman Scholarship applicants. Application procedures can be found at www.ngai.com/services.aspx. Applications need to be received at NGAI offices by 5 March 2015 in order to be considered this year.</p> Prairie Minuteman Scholarships
The Board of Directors of NGAI has established a scholarship program to support members' families. The scholarship is open to dependents (both children and spouses) of NGAI members in good standing. The program will award one $2,500.00 scholarship to an IL Army National Guard dependent, one $2,500.00 scholarship to an IL Air National Guard dependent and one $2,500 scholarship to an at large dependent. In addition, a fourth $1,000.00 scholarship sponsored by USAA Insurance and Financial Services Company through the Enlisted Association of the national Guard of the United Stataes (EANGUS,) will be awarded to a dependent of an enlisted IL National Guard NGAI member.

 
<p>

PEORIA,
Ill. - Nine Sustainment Services Flight
Airmen with the Illinois Air National Guard’s 182nd Airlift Wing in Peoria,
Illinois, returned home Jan. 17 after a seven-month deployment to Southwest
Asia in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).
</p><p>
“We
are very proud to welcome home our services personnel who deployed in support
of our missions overseas,” said Col. William P. Robertson of Peoria, Illinois.  “Our services personnel are second to none.
They provided top-notch support that exceeded expectations of the command
overseas.”

</p><p>The
Airmen are members of 182nd Force Support Squadron, a component of the 182nd
Mission Support Group.
</p><p>
“I
am very proud of each one of them as they continue to raise the bar each time
they do the mission,” said Robertson.  “It's
not easy to leave your civilian job and family to answer a call to duty.  I am sure they are ready for a break and to
get back to their families.  My thanks to
those families who sacrificed along with their deployed loved ones.  We can't do it without their support, the
support of their civilian employers and the support of our community.”

</p><p>As
part of the Sustainment Services Flight, they provided life-sustaining
functions as well as food services, fitness and lodging services for the
deployed location. The team coordinated six Armed Forces entertainment and USO
events, including 80 distinguished visitor tours for the 700 Airmen assigned to
the location. Additionally, they provided lodging operations, which consisted
of managing over 850 bed spaces including 100 distinguished visitors and 200
aircrew beds, using 92 percent of the installations capacity.
</p><p>
“This
deployment demonstrated the value of the Air National Guard capability to our country
and the fact that our members deploy globally serving our nation’s call,” said
Col. Cory K. Reid of Bartonville, Illinois, 182nd Mission Support Group
commander.  “They performed flawlessly.
Now we are able to welcome them safely back home and congratulate them on a job
well done.”

</p><p>The
182nd Airlift Wing flies the C-130 aircraft, which is primarily used to
transport cargo, personnel and aeromedical evacuees. Since Sept. 11, 2001, the
182nd has deployed more than 4,000 members in support of operations Enduring
and Iraqi Freedom.  Many of the wing’s
members have deployed numerous times. The wing has flown more than 17,500 hours
in direct support of OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom. This deployment cycle is
one of many in the wing’s history of supporting the Global War on Terrorism.

</p> Sustainment Services Flight Airmen return from overseas mission
PEORIA, Ill. - Nine Sustainment Services Flight Airmen with the Illinois Air National Guard’s 182nd Airlift Wing in Peoria, Illinois, returned home Jan. 17 after a seven-month deployment to Southwest Asia in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).

 
<p>

Do Well 

 

</p><p>Much information comes to the The
Adjutant General in bits, pieces, dribbles and drops. On occasion, it is
challenging to organize, synthesize and interpret all the information so a
coherent Vision is developed, a plan worked and success achieved. Long ago I
learned, ‘in order to know where you’re going, you’ve got to know where you are.’
To that end – getting to the future - I asked leadership for a list of things
we in the Illinois National Guard do well. What I received was . . . a book . .
. over an inch thick. I read every page. While we are always ready to be where
needed, what follows may give you an understanding of the excellence of where
we are as we begin Calendar Year 2015. 

 

</p><p><b>Army</b> 

</p><p>The 129th Regional Training Academy
achieving accreditation as an “Institute of Excellence”; leading the nation in
DMOSQ; Army Award for Maintenance Excellence; Supply Excellence Award;
Transportation Corps Officer/NCO of the year; second in the nation in Federal
Information Security Management Act Training; first place - NGB 2013 Media
Contest; 33rd IBCT with four of the top five battalions nationwide the past two
years; second in the nation for Purchasing and Contracting Small Business; the
ILARNG had a 6 percent gain in personnel readiness; consistently first or
second nationally in our end strength. 

 

</p><p><b>Air</b> 

</p><p>National Engineering Installation
awards winners; one of only three units to receive an “Outstanding;” outstanding
ANG Security Forces Support Staff NCO – first in the U.S; Benchmark ASOC
Intelligence program for the U.S. Air Force. 

 

</p><p><b>Joint</b> 

</p><p>Still the “Gold Standard” for the
State Partnership Program; Counter-Drug NCOIC Civil Operator of the Year; increased
partnering capabilities with state and federal agencies; radically increasing
our domestic operations and home land security footprint; 90+ percent rating
for our Family readiness. 

 

</p><p><b>State and Contract Employees</b> 

</p><p>Repeatedly, in times of fiscal
uncertainty – both state and federal – I see their dedication and hard work to
take care of Soldiers, Airmen, and Families. Only one employee administers what
former Governor Quinn called “the most efficient, cost effective program in
state government.” The Illinois Military Relief Fund has approved more than
29,000 grants totaling more than $15.6 million. 

 

</p><p>The Illinois State Military Museum –
a staff of two state employees and numerous volunteers - maintains more than
12,000 historical items. Many of those items are one-of-a-kind and
irreplaceable. Selfless service is a core value shared by both the Army and Air
Force. IDMA has 48 employees who have served the ILNG for more than 20 years. Thirteen
of the 48 have served for more than 30 years. Mrs. Debra Kieffer has worked at
Camp Lincoln for 38 years - the department’s longest serving employee. 

 
</p><p>
I see them going above
and beyond to make sure we all accomplish the mission of helping our neighbors,
protecting our state, and defending our nation.

</p><p><b>National Special Security Event (NSSE)</b> 

</p><p>Perhaps the best
example of the Illinois National Guard coming together to achieve outstanding
success is found in our hosting 4,000+ of our ‘closest friends’ at the NSSE
event in Chicago this past summer. That event demanded the highest level of
cooperation, best talents, incredibly hard work and long hours from our Soldiers,
Airmen, civilians, volunteers and Families. According to many others from
around the country, Chicago was the best-organized, most professional, and
‘politest’ NGAUS National event of their experience. </p><p>

This listing is nowhere
near exhaustive; it is simply exemplary. 

</p><p>YOU did it. We are
doing it. We will even get better at doing what we do. Because of you, the ILNG
– Army and Air – is Ready, Responsive, Accountable, Resilient and Relevant. Day
by day we are becoming premiere, wherein others ask US, ‘how is it done?’ 

</p><p>On behalf of our
neighbors, our state and our nation, I thank you and your Families, for your
service and sacrifices. We are strong – and as you look around, you too will
see – we are getting stronger. 

 

</p><p>Thank you.

 

 

</p> Where We're At and Where We're Going

Do Well  

Much information comes to the The Adjutant General in bits, pieces, dribbles and drops. On occasion, it is challenging to organize, synthesize, and interpret all the information so a coherent Vision is developed, a plan worked and success achieved. Long ago I learned, ‘in order to know where you’re going, you’ve got to know where you are.’ To that end – getting to the future - I asked leadership for a list of things we in the Illinois National Guard do well. What I received was . . . a book . . . over an inch thick. I read every page. While we are always ready to be where needed, what follows may give you an understanding of the excellence of where we are as we begin Calendar Year 2015.


 
<p>

By Col. Randy Sikowski, Chief of the Joint Staff</p><p>The seasons are upon us! 
Not only the holiday season, but also the season of requests for
assistance of the Illinois National Guard to respond to emergencies within the
state.  As a state, Illinois faces many
challenges in the form of natural or manmade disasters.  Many emergency responses are predicable,
others are not.  Flooding, snowstorms and
cold spells are all predictable occurrences in Illinois and planned for based
on weather predictions and flood modeling. 
Other responses are less predictable and require more in-depth planning
and research.  Domestic operations
preparedness is one of many responsibilities of the Illinois National Guard
(ILNG) Joint Staff in Illinois.     

</p><p>The ILNG Joint Staff is responsible for
coordinating, planning, training and executing National Guard homeland defense,
National Special Security Events, Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA)
and other domestic missions both within the state of Illinois and elsewhere in
the United States, at the direction of the Adjutant General and Governor of
Illinois. The Joint Staff is responsible for providing
oversight of ILNG domestic readiness and works through the services to prepare
units for service consistent with applicable policies, regulations and
instructions.  As the holiday season
concludes the Illinois National Guard enters the season where historically,
requests for defense support to civil authorities are the norm.

</p><p>Reflecting on our ethos “From Strong to Stronger” the
ILNG has a long and proud history of performing both its federal and state
missions with great success.  The mission
statement of the ILNG is, “a joint team of citizen-soldiers and Airmen ready to
help our neighbors, protect our state and defend our nation.”

</p><p>We, as the ILNG, must be
prepared to move quickly and efficiently to effectively meet the Governor’s
mission as we have consistently done over the past decade in support overseas
contingency operations.  Past historical
ILNG responses include; Winter Storm ION (2014), Presidential Inauguration (2013/2009), Federal Election (2012/2008), Numerous
Presidential Visits (2008-2012), Southwest Border Operations (2014/2012), NATO
Summit (2012), Super Storm Sandy (2012), Hurricane Irene (2011), Ohio River
Floods (2011), Winter Storms (2011/2014), North Dakota Flooding (2010), Gulf
Oil Spill (2010), Mississippi River Floods (2008/2011),  and the Macon County Ice Storm (2006), to
name a few.

</p><p>Every Soldier and Airman must be personally and
professionally ready to respond when called to service, domestically and
abroad.  Ensure your alert rosters are current
and unit members contact information is current and correct.  To save lives and protect property within the
state, servicemembers must be physically and medically prepared to perform
missions.  Let us not forget our
responsibilities here at home!

</p><p>In closing, I wish everyone a happy and safe holiday
season and ask you are prepared to respond to an emergency.  It comforts me to know the Illinois National
Guard is prepared and ready.     

</p> Domestic Operations Update
The seasons are upon us!  Not only the holiday season, but also the season of requests for assistance of the Illinois National Guard to respond to emergencies within the state.  As a state, Illinois faces many challenges in the form of natural or manmade disasters.  Many emergency responses are predicable, others are not.  Flooding, snowstorms and cold spells are all predictable occurrences in Illinois and planned for based on weather predictions and flood modeling.  Other responses are less predictable and require more in-depth planning and research.  Domestic operations preparedness is one of many responsibilities of the Illinois National Guard (ILNG) Joint Staff in Illinois.     

 
<p>

By Col. Stephen Baggerly, Director of
Staff-Air

</p><p>As I approach the close of my 31 years of military
service July 31, 2015, I thought back at the opportunities I had in the Air
National Guard and some of my successes, which I can directly attribute to the
mentors in my life and career.  Wikipedia
defines mentorship as “a personal developmental relationship in which a more
experienced or more knowledgeable person helps to guide a less experienced or
less knowledgeable person.”  As a
fledgling navigator and Weapon Systems Officer (WSO) in the F-4 Phantom, I found
more experienced 170th Fighter Squadron WSOs and pilots to guide me in
developing skills in navigation, tactics and employment of the dual-seat
fighter jet.  Several experienced
officers (one named Wayne “Rosey” Rosenthal comes to mind) took me under their
wing and taught me how to plan, lead and execute missions and to put “bombs on
target” and survival techniques as we trained during the Cold War.  These officers became both friends and
mentors as I gained confidence and began to lead other younger, less
experienced Airmen.  

</p><p>When my flying career ended in 1990, I turned over a new
page in my career as a non-flying officer and was assigned to work for a young
captain working in the Financial Management Office as the comptroller.  His name was Capt. William Cobetto.  Also assigned was Chief Master Sgt. Bernie
Noonan.  Both of these gentlemen sat me
down and helped me learn about financial management, auditing, organizational
dynamics and inter-personal relationships in the everyday running of the wing.  It was a different world than a fighter
squadron and the expectations were much different as well.  As I made the transition to non-flying
duties, my commander in the Resource Management Squadron gave me suggestions
and insights in the art of getting along with others and how to get things
done.  He also laid out expectations on
belonging to professional organizations, performing community service and
volunteering to enhance the image of the Air National Guard within Springfield
and the surrounding areas.  He also asked
me to join organizations I had not heard of before; National Guard Association
of Illinois (NGAI) and the National Guard Association of the United States
(NGAUS).  My commander said joining these
organizations was expected and will “enhance your career.”  As a good officer, I dug my checkbook out and
joined. Those memberships have helped me meet others and keep abreast of
changing environments due to world events and budget growths and declines over
the years.  I had many mentors in my
years through these professional organizations and consider some of them friends.

</p><p>There is conclusive evidence in the civilian world of
work suggests that an effective mentoring program can enhance recruitment of
personnel, enhance retention of personnel, support diversity goals and
objectives, and enhance employee satisfaction. 
 Mentoring also supports succession
planning within organizations and helps to ensure the organization either stays
the course or shifts focus to keep up with evolving trends in the
marketplace.  Within the military
environment, I see many similar aspects of a strong mentoring program.  Since the business arena has had success with
mentoring programs, the military has instituted formalized mentoring
programs.  The Air Force even authorized
an Air Force Instruction (AFI) formalizes its mentoring program.  AFI 36-2643, Air Force Mentoring Program, states “mentoring is an essential
ingredient in developing well-rounded, professional, and competent future
leaders.”  I strongly agree my previous
commanders and supervisors had an ongoing process help me build strong
professional relationships which helped me foster effective means of
communications with others.  This, in
turn, helped me develop leadership skills, which allowed me to help others develop
both personally and professionally, and enhanced morale and discipline while
improving the operational environment.  

</p><p>It is my belief that mentoring is an inherent
responsibility of being a leader. 
Helping others to grow professionally is essential and ensures the
organization can engage with and retain Airmen with the skill sets and
competencies required to compete with the civilian world.  Effective communications is a by-product of a
strong mentoring program and it enhances your capacity to translate
organizational directives, goals and strategies into productive programs,
actions and proficiencies.   With mentoring comes an effective feedback
system.  With mentoring should come
communications back and forth from the mentor to the mentored.
</p><p>
If you, as an enlisted member or an officer, do not have
a mentor, you should seek one out.  Overtime,
having a mentor working with you will help you develop leadership skills,
professionally develop, organizationally develop and learn to balance the
demands of being a member of the military with your family, professional and
educational needs.  Mentors can share
their experiences with you, share their knowledge with you, give you
encouragement and give you strategic direction as you head down your career
path.  

</p><p>Lastly, being a mentor and having a mentor ties in
directly with Maj. Gen. Krumrei’s Strategic Plan, his key tenets and his
strategic goals and objections. 
Mentorship can, and will, enhance readiness by helping build a strong
force, help retain the force, aid in developing the force and lead to the
development of strong officers and NCOs. 
My suggestion is, if you don’t have a mentor, find one.  If you are not a mentor, become one and if
you are a mentor, thank you for being one.  
Our ILNG will be a better place because of a strong mentorship program
and help us move “From Strong to Stronger.”

</p> Mentorship, An Important Ingredient to Success

As I approach the close of my 31 years of military service July 31, 2015, I thought back at the opportunities I had in the Air National Guard and some of my successes, which I can directly attribute to the mentors in my life and career.  Wikipedia defines mentorship as “a personal developmental relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps to guide a less experienced or less knowledgeable person.”


 
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